Majoring in marijuana? That soon could be common as universities adapt to a growth industry.

Want practical experience growing marijuana, but have no idea how to get a plant? Or just not comfortable growing cannabis at home? Try stinging nettle, which is a plant that’s distantly related to cannabis and has similar growth patterns. That’s just one of many workarounds Dana Milstein had to learn as she developed curriculum for UC Riverside’s new extension program focused on cannabis, which is the first program of its kind at a public university in California. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.
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Fullerton hires part-time staffer to weed out unlicensed cannabis businesses

Looking to crack down on illegal cannabis businesses in the city, Fullerton is set to hire a new code enforcement officer whose job will focus solely on finding and shutting down unlicensed pot shops and other marijuana-related businesses. City Council members recently gave the green light for the city to launch a two-year pilot program, under which the officer will be employed part-time, focusing 28 hours per week on the job. Matt Foulkes, director of community and economic development in Fullerton, said the issue of unlicensed weed stores has been an “ongoing problem” in the city, albeit more mild compared to the numbers nearby cities have seen. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.
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What’s life like after life for weed? Six months after clemency, Corvain Cooper fights for place in legal industry

This Fourth of July held new meaning for Corvain Cooper, who feared he’d never celebrate another holiday as a free man. Six months ago, Cooper was in a prison in Louisiana. The Los Angeles native had been sentenced to federal prison in 2014 for his role in a scheme to sell marijuana across state lines. Though there had been no allegations of violence, Cooper’s two prior minor drug convictions meant the cannabis conviction was a third strike, forcing a judge to send the then-34-year-old to prison for life without the possibility of parole. But on Jan. 19, as one of his last actions as president, Donald Trump granted Cooper clemency. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.
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U.S. House again passes Colorado congressman’s marijuana banking bill

The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday passed the SAFE Banking Act, a longtime priority for Coloradans in Congress and local cannabis companies. The House voted 321-101 on the bill, with all Colorado Democrats in favor and two Colorado Republicans opposed. A third Republican, Rep. Lauren Boebert, did not vote. It now moves to the U.S. Senate, which is split 50-50 between Democrats and Republicans, and some in the latter party worry passing it will increase marijuana use and foreign investments. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.
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Marijuana arrests are way down – but Black Coloradans are still twice as likely to get busted for pot, new report says

Seven years after the first recreational pot shops opened for business in Colorado, youth aren’t smoking more weed, older adults are blazing more and marijuana-related arrests are way down — but Black Coloradans are still much more likely to get in trouble for cannabis offenses, according to a state report released Monday. The biennial report — “Impacts on Marijuana Legalization in Colorado,” commissioned by the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice — is the most extensive look since 2018 at marijuana’s impact across public safety, health, driving and youth consumption. Overall, the authors highlight a few notable trends in the way cannabis is being consumed in Colorado: People are moving away from smoking and instead are consuming cannabis through vapes and edibles at higher rates. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.
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California regulators say cannabis billboards along interstate highways must come down

Cannabis businesses can no longer advertise on billboards anywhere along a highway that crosses state borders, after a judge ruled in a favor of a central California dad who sued to block such ads. The ruling won’t impact stretches of in-state freeways populated with marijuana billboards, such as the 55 in Orange County or the 215 in the Inland Empire. But the Bureau of Cannabis Control said Thursday that billboard companies must immediately stop selling space to marijuana shops and start taking down existing ads near roadways that at any point cross state borders. This will mean no cannabis billboards near heavily used freeways such as Interstate 10 in the Inland Empire, the 5 freeway in Orange County, and Highway 101 in Los Angeles. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.
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Study: California’s licensed cannabis shops aren’t selling to minors

California’s licensed marijuana shops are doing an excellent job at preventing sales to minors, according to a first-of-its-kind study commissioned by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. That means the industry is living up to a key promise advocates made when voters legalized cannabis for adults 21 and older nearly five years ago. “Licensed marijuana retailers are clearly keen to follow the rules,” said Angela Eichelberger, a research scientist with the Insurance Institute who authored the report with University of Chicago and University of Minnesota experts. “They’re aware that the industry hasn’t won everybody over yet, and they don’t want to get shut down.” Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.
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Denver could soon allow weed delivery, plus more recreational shops and consumption clubs

  Denver is poised to overhaul the local weed industry with a pair of laws that would bring cannabis products to your door and make the lucrative business more equitable. The Denver City Council will first vote on the overhaul package Monday night. If it passes, the second vote and final vote will come hours before the unofficial cannabis holiday of April 20, when Mayor Michael Hancock is expected to sign it into law. Both bills have been in the works for several years, according to Eric Escudero, spokesman for the city’s Department of Excise and Licenses. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.
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Pot regulators launching online catalog of marijuana products

The Cannabis Control Commission is launching an online catalog of the myriad marijuana products available at the state’s pot shops and dispensaries to help cops, parents and regulators alike tell the difference between what’s legal, and what’s not. The first-in-the-nation regulators’ catalog won’t exactly compete with Leafly and Weedmaps — so don’t expect genetic information or flavor profiles. Instead, the idea is to compile basic information and photos in one place so that police, regulators, consumers, and parents can get a better sense of the type of products that are part of the still-young legal cannabis world, and can tell the difference between what’s legal and what’s not. Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.
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Grand Junction voters approve lifting 10-year moratorium on marijuana dispensaries

A 10-year moratorium on marijuana sales has been overturned by voters in Grand Junction. On Tuesday voters handily approved ballot questions 2A, Taxation on Regulated Marijuana, and 2B, Lifting Moratorium on Marijuana Businesses, according to voting results. On the 2A question: 9,235 voters said “yes”; with 7,309 voters casting a “no” vote. On the 2B question: 9,755 voters approved, with 7,055 voters disapproving. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.
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Colorado may see its biggest overhaul of marijuana laws since recreational legalization

They don’t make cannabis products like they used to, and there’s an increasing number of Colorado lawmakers who think that’s problematic. As recently as 2014, the vast majority of medical and recreational cannabis sold in Colorado was flower and only 11% was the high-potency concentrates consumed through dab rigs or vape pens. By 2019, concentrates took up a third of the market and flower was below 50%. With the rising popularity of high-THC concentrates, which are several times more potent than flower and edibles, come worries among deep-pocketed political groups and their statehouse allies that teenagers have too much access to it without enough knowledge of the effects. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.
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