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Grand Junction voters approve lifting 10-year moratorium on marijuana dispensaries

A 10-year moratorium on marijuana sales has been overturned by voters in Grand Junction.

On Tuesday voters handily approved ballot questions 2A, Taxation on Regulated Marijuana, and 2B, Lifting Moratorium on Marijuana Businesses, according to voting results.

On the 2A question: 9,235 voters said “yes”; with 7,309 voters casting a “no” vote. On the 2B question: 9,755 voters approved, with 7,055 voters disapproving.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

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Study: California’s licensed cannabis shops aren’t selling to minors

California’s licensed marijuana shops are doing an excellent job at preventing sales to minors, according to a first-of-its-kind study commissioned by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

That means the industry is living up to a key promise advocates made when voters legalized cannabis for adults 21 and older nearly five years ago.

“Licensed marijuana retailers are clearly keen to follow the rules,” said Angela Eichelberger, a research scientist with the Insurance Institute who authored the report with University of Chicago and University of Minnesota experts. “They’re aware that the industry hasn’t won everybody over yet, and they don’t want to get shut down.”

Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

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Marijuana-themed license plates are up for auction in Colorado

If you wanted your high-country license plate to be even “higher,” now is your chance.

Colorado motorists can buy the rights to marijuana-themed plates.

The Colorado Disability Funding Committee is conducting a license plate auction that ends April 20. Some of the plates are “HEMP,” “GANJA,” “GREEN,” “BONG,” “HASH,” “INDICA” and “TEGRIDY.”

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New York legalizes pot – The Cannabist

New York adults over the age of 21 can now possess and use marijuana — even in public — under a legalization bill signed Wednesday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, though legal sales of recreational-use cannabis won’t start for an estimated 18 months until regulations are set.

Passed after several years of stalled efforts, the measure makes New York the 16th state to legalize adult use of the drug, though South Dakota’s measure is in legal limbo.

New York becomes the second-most populous state, after California, to legalize recreational marijuana. Legalization backers hope the Empire State will add momentum and set an example with its efforts to redress the inequities of a system that has locked up people of color for marijuana offenses at disproportionate rates.

Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.

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Editorial: White House in the weeds on pot use

Good help is hard to find. President Biden should keep that in mind considering dozens of White House staffers are being disciplined, released and asked to resign for past marijuana use, according to several press reports.

Some of those facing discipline and expulsion are from states and localities where marijuana is legal. In addition, the administration had previously indicated that it would be loosening restrictions around past marijuana use, with NBC news reporting in February that waivers would be granted at the administration’s discretion for limited use of the drug in the past.

Assured by transition staff that Biden’s team was more understanding of recreational marijuana use than past White Houses have been, young staffers had disclosed marijuana use in documents which were part of their lengthy background checks, something standard for employees at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

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Report: California needs to better track and test drugged drivers

Nearly five years after California voters legalized cannabis, a new state report is recommending a series of changes to better track and test for drivers impaired by marijuana and other drugs.

Those recommendations from the California Highway Patrol’s Impaired Driving Task Force are expected to trigger a series of new and revived bills in the state legislature over the coming months.

The CHP report calls for the state to start collecting and publishing data on the number of drivers arrested or involved in accidents with cannabis and other drugs in their system. There’s currently no central collection point for such data, and no statewide standards for the few city or county agencies that gather such data on their own.

Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

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